Students with Interrupted Formal Education

  1. Academic Language and Literacy Diagnostic (ALLD). New York City Department of Education page s . 2007. Albanian Arabic Bengali Chinese English French Haitian Creole Korean Polish Russian Spanish Urdu . http://schoolsstg.nycenet.edu/NR/rdonlyres/BF9360C3-9942-48ED-AF83-BA8E85893367/50153/ALLDFAQ_FINAL.pdf

    This diagnostic tool was designed to identify Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE).  The ALLD standardizes the SIFE identification process for children who speak English or Spanish as a home language.  Many refugee youth arriving to the United States may have missed or been forced to stop attending school in their home countries or while displaced abroad.  New York City public schools use this standardized diagnostic test to identify SIFE among new children entering the school system.

  2. Breaking New Ground: Teaching Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE) in U.S. Secondary Schools. Decapua, Andrea , Marshall, Helaine W. 160 page s . 2011. English This resource may be free from your local library or purchased from the publisher.

    This book introduces readers to and engages them in the implementation of an instructional model that has been developed over many years of working with students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE).

  3. Creating Access: Language and Academic Programs for Secondary School Newcomers. Short, Deborah J. , Boyson, Beverly A. 173 page s . 2004. English This resource may be free from your local library or purchased from the publisher.

    "This book describes the ins and outs of an exciting new education model-newcomer programs for immigrant students. Students from non-English-speaking backgrounds are the fastest growing segment of the K-12 student population in the United States. An increasing number of these students are newcomers - recent immigrants with limited English proficiency and often limited experience in schools. Newcomer programs offer school districts a progressive approach to meeting the unique language and academic needs of these newcomers, while also meeting the demand for high standards and accountability for all students. This book is designed to help district personnel create a newcomer program or enhance an existing program. It reports on a 4-year study of 115 middle and high school newcomer programs. The authors identify important implementation features and offer a checklist for developing a new program, practical advice for existing programs, and in-depth case studies of three successful long-term newcomer programs." - Publisher's description reprinted with permission

  4. Effective Programs for English Language Learners (ELL) with Interrupted Formal Education. Office of English Language Learning & Migrant Education, Indiana Department of Education 11 page s . 2009. English . http://www.brycs.org/documents/upload/SIFE-Article-final-OT.pdf

    Highlights the problems when immigrant students enter the U.S. school systems with low academic language skills and provides an overview of instructional approaches to deal with these issues. Among the models developed to address Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE) are the Pull-out Model, Push-In Model, and After-School and Saturday programs. Best learning practices for SIFE students include sheltered instruction, content- based ESL, and meaningful standards-based learning and as the numbers of SIFE ELL students increase, newcomer programs continue to be established to address the challenges of low literacy skills and limited time available on the part of the student. Studies show that the success of SIFE ELL programs depends on the quality of teaching, thoroughness of instruction, methods used to support special language needs, monitoring of progress and application, and teacher preparation. Numerous components of literacy development include phonemic awareness, phonics, oral language development, vocabulary, and comprehension. In addition to language, math is identified as a challenge, as immigrants struggle to learn content vocabulary and expressions of math.  Includes a bulleted list on "What Works in Instruction of Students with Interrupted Formal Education."

  5. Effective Programs for English Language Learners with Interrupted Formal Education. Tuchman, Olga 25 page s . 2010. . http://www.brycs.org/documents/upload/ELLswithInterruptedFormalEducation.pdf

    This presentation includes common features of an effective program for SIFE students, types of language skills students need to acquire to be truly proficient in English, best practices, instructional strategies, literacy development, assessment strategies, testing alternatives, and grading alternatives.

  6. Establishing an Effective Newcomer Program ERIC Digest. Short, Deborah J. , Boyson, Beverly A. , Center for Applied Linguistics 3 page s . December 2003. English . http://www.cal.org/resources/digest/digest_pdfs/0312short.pdf

    "This digest describes the ins and outs of an exciting new education model-newcomer programs for immigrant students. Students from non-English-speaking backgrounds are the fastest growing segment of the K-12 student population in the United States. An increasing number of these students are newcomers - recent immigrants with limited English proficiency and often limited experience in schools. Newcomer programs offer school districts a progressive approach to meeting the unique language and academic needs of these newcomers, while also meeting the demand for high standards and accountability for all students. This digest is designed to help district personnel create a newcomer program or enhance an existing program. It reports on a 4-year study of 115 middle and high school newcomer programs. The authors identify important implementation features and offer a checklist for developing a new program, practical advice for existing programs, and in-depth case studies of three successful long-term newcomer programs." - Publisher's description

  7. Helping Newcomer Students Succeed in Secondary Schools and Beyond. Short, Deborah J. , Boyson, Beverly A. 124 page s . January 2012. English . http://www.cal.org/resources/pubs/helping-newcomer-students-succeed-in-secondary-schools-and-beyond.html

    This report was written for educators and policymakers to focus attention on newcomer adolescent English language learners at the middle and high school grades and to communicate promising practices for serving their educational and social needs.  It is based on a three year national research study of secondary school newcomer programs.

  8. How to Design and Implement a Newcomer Program. Custodio, Brenda 175 page s . 2011. English This resource may be free from your local library or purchased from the publisher.

    This resource includes practical advice to help educators develop and implement a newcomer program, prepare the site, develop the curriculum, interview and hire staff, and continually build and grow a successful program based on learners' needs. The author, Brenda Custodio, has over 25 years in the ELL field and also recently conducted an interactive Webinar on the topic.

  9. How to Support ELL Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFEs). Robertson, Kristina , Lafond, Susan page s . 2008. . http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/27483

    Discusses who Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFEs) are, where they come from, what makes their needs unique, and ten Ideas for providing school-wide and classroom support.

  10. Meeting the Needs of Students with Limited or Interrupted Schooling: A Guide for Educators. DeCapua, Andrea , Smathers, William , Tang, Lixing Frank 115 page s . 2009. English This resource may be free from your local library or purchased from the publisher.

    This handbook was designed for secondary teachers and administrators.  It addresses some of the issues facing this subpopulation of English language learners who have limited or interrupted formal schooling, helping teachers to meet this group's specific needs.

  11. Newcomers in Chicago Unit Plan. Troiano, Beverly 25 page s . unknown. English . http://www.olce.org/HS_Unit_PDF/unit%20Plan%20newcomers'%20Chicago.pdf

    This unit is designed to help low literacy students express their feelings living in a new country, and at the same time learn basic school skills. Students with little or no prior education need to learn the concept of "school" which includes organizing papers in a binder or folder, working individually and in groups, comprehending oral directions, asking and answering questions, brainstorming, building vocabulary, acting, guessing, presenting, reading and listening to oneself read, typing, using a computer, and experiencing the writing process.

  12. Reaching ELLs at Risk: Instruction for Students with Limited/Interrupted Formal Education. DeCapua, Andrea , Marshall, Helaine W. 8 page s . October 2010. English . http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10459880903291680

    This article examines salient academic and cultural issues and describes a new instructional model to help teachers adapt their instruction to facilitate the active engagement of this student population, as well as transition them to the learning environment U.S. educational system.

  13. Secondary Newcomer Programs in the U.S.. Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) . 2009. . http://www.cal.org/CALWebDB/Newcomer/

    This searchable online database of middle and high school newcomer programs has recently been updated and now includes more than 60 program profiles. The database includes newcomer programs that serve students in 23 states and provides information on student newcomer demographics, program design, instruction and assessment, student transitions, staffing, family connections, and social networks.

  14. Secondary School Newcomer Programs in the United States. Boyson, Beverly A. , Short, Deborah J. 44 page s . 2003. English . http://www.cal.org/crede/pdfs/rr12.pdf

    The purpose of the 4-year research study was to identify and document programs designed for new immigrant students in middle schools and high schools across the United States and to examine the ways that these programs promote the students' transition into U.S. schools.

  15. Serving Children With Little or No Previous Formal Schooling. Bridging Refugee Youth and Children Services (BRYCS) 2 page s . March 2005. English . http://www.brycs.org/documents/upload/brycs_spotmar2005.pdf

    Several groups of refugees have recently resettled in the U.S. after having waited for years in refugee camps for resettlement: the Somali Bantu, the Hmong, and the Liberians. The majority of these new arrivals are originally from rural areas, are more likely to be pre-literate, and many of these children and youth may have had limited or no access to formal schooling. Due to these gaps in education and differences in background, these refugees often undergo an extensive process of adjustment to the school setting here in the U.S. At the same time, educators and other service providers are looking for resources in order to better understand and to assist these students and their families. This spotlight gives an overview of some of the issues and questions raised as we serve these newest arrivals and provides resources that can help address these concerns.

  16. Serving ELLs with Limited or Interrupted Education: Interventions that Work. Decapua, Andrea , Marshall, Helaine W. 49-70 page s . March 2010. English . http://www.tesolmedia.com/docs/TJ/firstissue/06_TJ_DeCapuaMarshall.pdf

    This article is based on the results of a 5-month intervention in one high school class of ELLs with limited or interrupted formal education using an instructional model developed by the authors.  Findings indicate that through the implementation of this instructional model, the teacher in this study was able to facilitate students’ transition to the U.S. educational system.

  17. Students with Interrupted Formal Education: A Challenge for the New York City Public Schools. Advocates for Children of New York 45 page s . May 2010. English . http://www.advocatesforchildren.org/SIFE%20Paper%20final.pdf

    This report presents numerical data on the school system's 15,000 immigrant students with interrupted formal education (SIFE) and profiles twelve immigrant students who should have been identified as SIFE by their schools.  

  18. Teaching Refugees with Limited Formal Schooling (Web site). Carlgary Board of Education page s . 2011. English . http://www.teachingrefugees.com/

    A Toolkit of resources supporting the practical application of ideas about refugee learners with limited formal schooling. The resources include downloadable PDF files and pages of links to additional reading materials about the experiences of refugees and displaced people, teaching materials to build understanding of the refugee situation in the world, and cultural profiles of the ethnocultural groups that arrive in North America as refugees. (Description from source)

  19. Welcoming and Orienting Newcomer Students to U.S. Schools. Bridging Refugee Youth and Children Services (BRYCS) 8 page s . 2008 Spring. English . http://www.brycs.org/documents/upload/brycs_spotspring2008-2.pdf

    This Spotlight focuses primarily on students' cultural and social adjustment, while recognizing the positive academic impact of successful socio-cultural adjustment. It examines the steps that teachers and administrators can take to integrate refugee children and youth into their schools, first looking at newcomer programs and other means of welcoming and accommodating foreign-born students, then discussing means of facilitating the social integration of newcomer students by teaching American-born students about refugee and immigrant populations, openly discussing racism, and preventing bullying.

  20. Working with Limited English Proficient Students: Input from the Field on a High School Newcomer Program. Munoz, Marco A. , Clavijo, Catherine 17 page s . 2000. English . http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED463366.pdf

    While the number of limited English proficient (LEP) students has grown nationwide, these students' academic achievement levels have lagged significantly behind those of their language majority peers. Dropout rates among LEP students are also high. The Newcomer Program within Kentucky's Jefferson County Public Schools is a full-day transitional English as a Second Language (ESL) program for newly arrived immigrant and refugee high school students. ESL teachers and bilingual associate instructors and teaching assistants share with the regular classroom teacher the responsibility of educating LEP students. This program offers students instruction in English as well as content classes with support in their native languages. It provides students with not just intensive language instruction, but also a safe educational environment in which to acquire basic academic and school survival skills. The Newcomer Program is characterized by an orientation to school, community, and society; an emphasis on English language development; and bilingual staff specifically trained to meet the needs of newcomer students. Evaluation of the program included classroom observations, focus group interviews with students, informal interviews with faculty and administrators, and student language testing. Results found that the Newcomer Program is meeting its goals of preparing students for mainstream classrooms. (SM) (ERIC No. ED463366)